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Hillary Clinton: Europe must curb immigration to stop rightwing populists
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a425couple
2018-11-24 21:52:35 UTC
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https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/nov/22/hillary-clinton-europe-must-curb-immigration-stop-populists-trump-brexit

(Well DUH, in a Democracy, sometimes you need to listen
to what the citizens say!)

Hillary Clinton: Europe must curb immigration to stop rightwing populists
The new populism
Hillary Clinton
Europe and centre left everywhere need tougher approach to phenomenon
that fuelled Trump and Brexit, says Clinton

Clinton, Blair, Renzi: why we lost, and how to fight back
Patrick Wintour Diplomatic editor

Thu 22 Nov 2018 09.00 EST Last modified on Thu 22 Nov 2018 21.29 EST

Hillary Clinton, a former US presidential candidate, suggests
immigration contributed to Brexit and Donald Trump’s election.
Europe must get a handle on immigration to combat a growing threat from
rightwing populists, Hillary Clinton has said, calling on the
continent’s leaders to send out a stronger signal showing they are “not
going to be able to continue to provide refuge and support”.

Clinton, Blair, Renzi: why we lost, and how to fight back
Read more
In an interview with the Guardian, the former Democratic presidential
candidate praised the generosity shown by the German chancellor, Angela
Merkel, but suggested immigration was inflaming voters and contributed
to the election of Donald Trump and Britain’s vote to leave the EU.

“I think Europe needs to get a handle on migration because that is what
lit the flame,” Clinton said, speaking as part of a series of interviews
with senior centrist political figures about the rise of populists,
particularly on the right, in Europe and the Americas.

“I admire the very generous and compassionate approaches that were taken
particularly by leaders like Angela Merkel, but I think it is fair to
say Europe has done its part, and must send a very clear message – ‘we
are not going to be able to continue provide refuge and support’ –
because if we don’t deal with the migration issue it will continue to
roil the body politic.”

Clinton’s remarks are likely to prove controversial across Europe, which
has struggled to form a unified position ever since more than 1 million
migrants and refugees arrived in the EU in 2015.

While some countries who have borne the brunt, such as Germany, Italy
and Greece, have argued for the burden to be shared more evenly, some,
particularly in central and eastern Europe, have rejected demands to
take in refugees.

Migration numbers have fallen sharply since 2015, while a series of
initiatives have been tabled, from a 10,000-member European border and
coastguard agency to an overhaul of EU asylum procedures.

You’ve got to deal with the legitimate grievances and answer them.
Tony Blair
Clinton was one of three heavyweights of the centre-left interviewed by
the Guardian to better understand why their brand of politics appears to
be failing. All three have seen their countries upended by political
events that to some degree can be explained by the success of rightwing
populism.

The other two interviewees, Tony Blair and Matteo Renzi, agreed that the
migration issue had posed significant problems for centrist politics.

“You’ve got to deal with the legitimate grievances and answer them,
which is why today in Europe you cannot possibly stand for election
unless you’ve got a strong position on immigration because people are
worried about it,” Blair said. “You’ve got to answer those problems. If
you don’t answer them then … you leave a large space into which the
populists can march.”

Clinton urged forces opposed to rightwing populism in Europe and the US
not to neglect the concerns about race and identity issues that she says
were behind her losing key votes in 2016. She accused Trump of
exploiting the issue in the election contest – and in office.

26:36
How Steve Bannon's far-right 'Movement' stalled in Europe – video
“The use of immigrants as a political device and as a symbol of
government gone wrong, of attacks on one’s heritage, one’s identity,
one’s national unity has been very much exploited by the current
administration here,” she said.

“There are solutions to migration that do not require clamping down on
the press, on your political opponents and trying to suborn the
judiciary, or seeking financial and political help from Russia to
support your political parties and movements.”

Brexit, described by Clinton as the biggest act of national economic
self-harm in modern history, “was largely about immigration”, she said.

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Matteo Renzi, who was Italian PM from
2014-16. Photograph: Pacific/Rex/Shutterstock
Clinton, Blair and Renzi all said rightwing populism had not just fed
off issues of identity but was also driven by a disruptive way of
conducting politics that dramatises divisions and uses a rhetoric of
crisis. The centre left struggles to get its voice heard over the
simplistic, emotional language used against it, they said.

Blair said populism would continue to rise until mainstream parties
found a way to cut through the reductive soundbites that populists
deploy so effectively.

“I don’t think it’s reached its peak,” he said, when asked about the
electoral success of populists globally. “I think it will peak, in my
view, when the centre ground recovers its mojo and has a strong forward
agenda.”

“A significant part of the problem here is people’s desire for a leader
that is going to just push through change without regard to political
pressures, you know, that ‘getting things done’ mentality.”

Clinton said rightwing populists in the west met “a psychological as
much as political yearning to be told what to do, and where to go, and
how to live and have their press basically stifled and so be given one
version of reality.

“The whole American system was designed so that you would eliminate the
threat from a strong, authoritarian king or other leader and maybe
people are just tired of it. They don’t want that much responsibility
and freedom. They want to be told what to do and where to go and how to
live … and only given one version of reality.

“I don’t know why at this moment that is so attractive to people, but
it’s a serious threat to our freedom and our democratic institutions,
and it goes very deep and very far and we’ve got to do a better job of
shining a light on it and trying to combat it.”

She also reveals her contempt for Steve Bannon, whose attempt to bolster
rightwing populist parties in Europe is stalling everywhere outside of
Italy. “Rome is the right place for him since it is bread and circuses
and it’s as old as recorded history. Keep people diverted, keep them
riled up appeal to their prejudices, give them a sense they are part of
something bigger than themselves – while elected leaders and business
leaders steal them blind. It’s a classic story and Bannon is the latest
avatar of it.”

Renzi bemoaned a generational shift that he said had elevated hate and
confrontation over admiration and respect. “There is a climate of hate
that has come from the Five Star Movement and the League,” he said of
his political opponents in Italy. “This is the problem of the new
generation – they are educated to hate and to envy.”


Topics
The new populism
Hillary Clinton

The new populism
Europe

Mexico: Tijuana declares humanitarian crisis over migrant caravan

Brexit: May gives way over Gibraltar after Spain's 'veto' threat
more on this story

US media must 'get smarter' to tackle Trump, says Hillary Clinton

How populist are you?

Clinton, Blair, Renzi: why we lost, and how to fight back

How populism became the concept that defines our age

Revealed: one in four Europeans vote populist

-----------------------------------------------
also
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/nov/23/hillary-clinton-populism-europe-immigration

Hillary Clinton’s chilling pragmatism gives the far right a free pass
Nesrine Malik
Calling on Europe’s leaders to ‘get a handle on migration’ is no counter
to populists – it’s more like an endorsement
Fri 23 Nov 2018 08.41 EST Last modified on Fri 23 Nov 2018 19.43 EST
Shares
9,896
Hillary Clinton speaks during a Democratic campaign rally in Miami on
24 October 2018.
‘In her own America, Clinton does not see the disconnect between the
populist posturing on immigration and the facts.’ Photograph: Cristóbal
Herrera/EPA

Ever since Hillary Clinton lost to Donald Trump in 2016, her insistence
on staying in the public eye has been viewed with a particular kind of
intolerance. Some on the right have turned her into a symbol of
everything they hate, to be demonised at their rallies. Others, on the
left, abhor her refusal to cede space to a newer generation, hanging in
the air like a bad smell, a constant memory of the moment it all went
wrong. But Hillary Clinton will not go away, and that is a very good
thing. Not because she should remain on the scene, fighting the good
fight against the forces of reaction, but because with every interview
and public appearance she is revealing in the most helpful way the
pointlessness of her politics.

Hillary Clinton: Europe must curb immigration to stop rightwing populists

In an interview with the Guardian as part of its series the new
populism, the former presidential candidate illustrated how a certain
brand of centrist politician has no rebuke or response to the far right
other than to mimic their tactics. On the issue of immigration in
Europe, she called on the continent’s leaders to erect the barricades.

“I think Europe needs to get a handle on migration because that is what
lit the flame,” she said. “I admire the very generous and compassionate
approaches that were taken particularly by leaders like Angela Merkel,
but I think it is fair to say Europe has done its part, and must send a
very clear message – ‘we are not going to be able to continue provide
refuge and support’ – because if we don’t deal with the migration issue
it will continue to roil the body politic.”

There is a fundamental error in this thinking. It assumes the results of
populist politicking are in fact its sources. Clinton believes she is on
to something, but it is offering nothing new. In the past two years
accepting the populist version of events and painting the left as out of
touch has become a genre of its own, a strain of thought that holds that
the success of the immigration rhetoric of populists is organic,
inevitable and a “backlash” of some sort, rather than one of several
ways that populist politicians build grievance. National populism is
thus “unstoppable”, it is the revolt of the “somewheres” against the
“anywheres”, “white self-interest”, a “whiteshift”. Clinton’s “beat them
at their own game” strategy is the default position on the establishment
centre, a capitulation of laziness, defeatism and gullibility.

Even those on the left can contort themselves into an anti-immigration
position in defence of white working-class populations

It also doesn’t work. It is one of the enduring perplexities of centrist
politics, one whose adherents attack the left for being unrealistic and
unconcerned with electoral victory, that on immigration it has stuck to
pandering to xenophobia despite the benefit of that never materialising
at the ballot box. It did not work for Ed Miliband and his “Controls on
immigration” mug, and it certainly has not worked for the immigration
hawks in his party such as Yvette Cooper who have yet to reap the
electoral spoils of propping up the hostile environment. You cannot
outflank the right by adopting its promises, that way you only end up as
its handmaiden.

So much of the failure on immigration is the inability to make a
positive case for it. Populist support did not flare up unstoked. It is
the result of concerted media and political campaigns that at best were
met with the neutral tepid language of “legitimate concerns”. That was
what Angela Merkel attempted and for that Hillary Clinton patronises her
as if she were a political freshman. Clinton’s logic is that “it is not
working”, as opposed to “it is not right”.

This chilling pragmatism exposes at best a lack of core beliefs:
political expediency is all that matters and immigration is not the hill
to die on. At worst it is a full-throated agreement with populists. The
tenor of Clinton’s comments, the harshness and impatience with tactics
that are not working, is a familiar sickener. Compassion is weakness,
defeat means only that the methods did not work, rather than that the
values were broken. There is no self-reflection.

In her own America, Clinton does not see the disconnect between the
populist posturing on immigration and the facts. Trump made clamping
down on illegal border crossings with Mexico a winning electoral and
polling strategy, despite the fact that such crossings hover at a
40-year historic low. In 2017, there were fewer deportations than in the
previous year under Barack Obama. In 2016, only three of the 16 states
with immigrant populations above 10% voted for Trump. In Europe, numbers
are already down from their 2015-16 highs because of harsher measures,
including a 2016 EU deal with Turkey, new border fences in the Balkans,
and a 2017 bilateral arrangement between Italy and Libya. But Clinton,
having learned a thing or two from populists who always claim the
floodgates are open, is still calling for the barriers to be raised.

I get it. Defeat is hard. Immigration is low hanging fruit, an easy win.
Even those on the left can contort themselves into an anti-immigration
position in defence of white working-class populations. But as a
response to the right it is a proven failed strategy, a race to the
bottom where populists will only benefit from the endorsement. “Why we
lost and how to fight back” was the title of the interview with Clinton
and other centrist politicians – and she unintentionally revealed the
real reason. This is why she lost, and this is why she will not be able
to fight back. I sincerely hope the rumours she will run again in 2020
are true and that Clinton does not go away until this stale,
weather-vane politics is exposed, and buried, for good.

• Nesrine Malik is a Guardian columnist
Walt In Seattlle
2018-11-25 08:06:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/seattle.politics/YcxyvqTajgg/5g3IlisSCAAJ
Post by a425couple
from
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/nov/22/hillary-clinton-europe-must-curb-immigration-stop-populists-trump-brexit
(Well DUH, in a Democracy, sometimes you need to listen
to what the citizens say!)
Hillary Clinton: Europe must curb immigration to stop rightwing populists
The new populism
Hillary Clinton
Europe and centre left everywhere need tougher approach to phenomenon
that fuelled Trump and Brexit, says Clinton
Clinton, Blair, Renzi: why we lost, and how to fight back
Patrick Wintour Diplomatic editor
Thu 22 Nov 2018 09.00 EST Last modified on Thu 22 Nov 2018 21.29 EST
Hillary Clinton, a former US presidential candidate, suggests
immigration contributed to Brexit and Donald Trump’s election.
Europe must get a handle on immigration to combat a growing threat from
rightwing populists, Hillary Clinton has said, calling on the
continent’s leaders to send out a stronger signal showing they are “not
going to be able to continue to provide refuge and support”.
Clinton, Blair, Renzi: why we lost, and how to fight back
Read more
In an interview with the Guardian, the former Democratic presidential
candidate praised the generosity shown by the German chancellor, Angela
Merkel, but suggested immigration was inflaming voters and contributed
to the election of Donald Trump and Britain’s vote to leave the EU.
“I think Europe needs to get a handle on migration because that is what
lit the flame,” Clinton said, speaking as part of a series of interviews
with senior centrist political figures about the rise of populists,
particularly on the right, in Europe and the Americas.
“I admire the very generous and compassionate approaches that were taken
particularly by leaders like Angela Merkel, but I think it is fair to
say Europe has done its part, and must send a very clear message – ‘we
are not going to be able to continue provide refuge and support’ –
because if we don’t deal with the migration issue it will continue to
roil the body politic.”
Clinton’s remarks are likely to prove controversial across Europe, which
has struggled to form a unified position ever since more than 1 million
migrants and refugees arrived in the EU in 2015.
While some countries who have borne the brunt, such as Germany, Italy
and Greece, have argued for the burden to be shared more evenly, some,
particularly in central and eastern Europe, have rejected demands to
take in refugees.
Migration numbers have fallen sharply since 2015, while a series of
initiatives have been tabled, from a 10,000-member European border and
coastguard agency to an overhaul of EU asylum procedures.
You’ve got to deal with the legitimate grievances and answer them.
Tony Blair
Clinton was one of three heavyweights of the centre-left interviewed by
the Guardian to better understand why their brand of politics appears to
be failing. All three have seen their countries upended by political
events that to some degree can be explained by the success of rightwing
populism.
The other two interviewees, Tony Blair and Matteo Renzi, agreed that the
migration issue had posed significant problems for centrist politics.
“You’ve got to deal with the legitimate grievances and answer them,
which is why today in Europe you cannot possibly stand for election
unless you’ve got a strong position on immigration because people are
worried about it,” Blair said. “You’ve got to answer those problems. If
you don’t answer them then … you leave a large space into which the
populists can march.”
Clinton urged forces opposed to rightwing populism in Europe and the US
not to neglect the concerns about race and identity issues that she says
were behind her losing key votes in 2016. She accused Trump of
exploiting the issue in the election contest – and in office.
26:36
How Steve Bannon's far-right 'Movement' stalled in Europe – video
“The use of immigrants as a political device and as a symbol of
government gone wrong, of attacks on one’s heritage, one’s identity,
one’s national unity has been very much exploited by the current
administration here,” she said.
“There are solutions to migration that do not require clamping down on
the press, on your political opponents and trying to suborn the
judiciary, or seeking financial and political help from Russia to
support your political parties and movements.”
Brexit, described by Clinton as the biggest act of national economic
self-harm in modern history, “was largely about immigration”, she said.
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Matteo Renzi, who was Italian PM from
2014-16. Photograph: Pacific/Rex/Shutterstock
Clinton, Blair and Renzi all said rightwing populism had not just fed
off issues of identity but was also driven by a disruptive way of
conducting politics that dramatises divisions and uses a rhetoric of
crisis. The centre left struggles to get its voice heard over the
simplistic, emotional language used against it, they said.
Blair said populism would continue to rise until mainstream parties
found a way to cut through the reductive soundbites that populists
deploy so effectively.
“I don’t think it’s reached its peak,” he said, when asked about the
electoral success of populists globally. “I think it will peak, in my
view, when the centre ground recovers its mojo and has a strong forward
agenda.”
“A significant part of the problem here is people’s desire for a leader
that is going to just push through change without regard to political
pressures, you know, that ‘getting things done’ mentality.”
Clinton said rightwing populists in the west met “a psychological as
much as political yearning to be told what to do, and where to go, and
how to live and have their press basically stifled and so be given one
version of reality.
“The whole American system was designed so that you would eliminate the
threat from a strong, authoritarian king or other leader and maybe
people are just tired of it. They don’t want that much responsibility
and freedom. They want to be told what to do and where to go and how to
live … and only given one version of reality.
“I don’t know why at this moment that is so attractive to people, but
it’s a serious threat to our freedom and our democratic institutions,
and it goes very deep and very far and we’ve got to do a better job of
shining a light on it and trying to combat it.”
She also reveals her contempt for Steve Bannon, whose attempt to bolster
rightwing populist parties in Europe is stalling everywhere outside of
Italy. “Rome is the right place for him since it is bread and circuses
and it’s as old as recorded history. Keep people diverted, keep them
riled up appeal to their prejudices, give them a sense they are part of
something bigger than themselves – while elected leaders and business
leaders steal them blind. It’s a classic story and Bannon is the latest
avatar of it.”
Renzi bemoaned a generational shift that he said had elevated hate and
confrontation over admiration and respect. “There is a climate of hate
that has come from the Five Star Movement and the League,” he said of
his political opponents in Italy. “This is the problem of the new
generation – they are educated to hate and to envy.”
Topics
The new populism
Hillary Clinton
The new populism
Europe
Mexico: Tijuana declares humanitarian crisis over migrant caravan
Brexit: May gives way over Gibraltar after Spain's 'veto' threat
more on this story
US media must 'get smarter' to tackle Trump, says Hillary Clinton
How populist are you?
Clinton, Blair, Renzi: why we lost, and how to fight back
How populism became the concept that defines our age
Revealed: one in four Europeans vote populist
-----------------------------------------------
also
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/nov/23/hillary-clinton-populism-europe-immigration
Hillary Clinton’s chilling pragmatism gives the far right a free pass
Nesrine Malik
Calling on Europe’s leaders to ‘get a handle on migration’ is no counter
to populists – it’s more like an endorsement
Fri 23 Nov 2018 08.41 EST Last modified on Fri 23 Nov 2018 19.43 EST
Shares
9,896
Hillary Clinton speaks during a Democratic campaign rally in Miami on
24 October 2018.
‘In her own America, Clinton does not see the disconnect between the
populist posturing on immigration and the facts.’ Photograph: Cristóbal
Herrera/EPA
Ever since Hillary Clinton lost to Donald Trump in 2016, her insistence
on staying in the public eye has been viewed with a particular kind of
intolerance. Some on the right have turned her into a symbol of
everything they hate, to be demonised at their rallies. Others, on the
left, abhor her refusal to cede space to a newer generation, hanging in
the air like a bad smell, a constant memory of the moment it all went
wrong. But Hillary Clinton will not go away, and that is a very good
thing. Not because she should remain on the scene, fighting the good
fight against the forces of reaction, but because with every interview
and public appearance she is revealing in the most helpful way the
pointlessness of her politics.
Hillary Clinton: Europe must curb immigration to stop rightwing populists
In an interview with the Guardian as part of its series the new
populism, the former presidential candidate illustrated how a certain
brand of centrist politician has no rebuke or response to the far right
other than to mimic their tactics. On the issue of immigration in
Europe, she called on the continent’s leaders to erect the barricades.
“I think Europe needs to get a handle on migration because that is what
lit the flame,” she said. “I admire the very generous and compassionate
approaches that were taken particularly by leaders like Angela Merkel,
but I think it is fair to say Europe has done its part, and must send a
very clear message – ‘we are not going to be able to continue provide
refuge and support’ – because if we don’t deal with the migration issue
it will continue to roil the body politic.”
There is a fundamental error in this thinking. It assumes the results of
populist politicking are in fact its sources. Clinton believes she is on
to something, but it is offering nothing new. In the past two years
accepting the populist version of events and painting the left as out of
touch has become a genre of its own, a strain of thought that holds that
the success of the immigration rhetoric of populists is organic,
inevitable and a “backlash” of some sort, rather than one of several
ways that populist politicians build grievance. National populism is
thus “unstoppable”, it is the revolt of the “somewheres” against the
“anywheres”, “white self-interest”, a “whiteshift”. Clinton’s “beat them
at their own game” strategy is the default position on the establishment
centre, a capitulation of laziness, defeatism and gullibility.
Even those on the left can contort themselves into an anti-immigration
position in defence of white working-class populations
It also doesn’t work. It is one of the enduring perplexities of centrist
politics, one whose adherents attack the left for being unrealistic and
unconcerned with electoral victory, that on immigration it has stuck to
pandering to xenophobia despite the benefit of that never materialising
at the ballot box. It did not work for Ed Miliband and his “Controls on
immigration” mug, and it certainly has not worked for the immigration
hawks in his party such as Yvette Cooper who have yet to reap the
electoral spoils of propping up the hostile environment. You cannot
outflank the right by adopting its promises, that way you only end up as
its handmaiden.
So much of the failure on immigration is the inability to make a
positive case for it. Populist support did not flare up unstoked. It is
the result of concerted media and political campaigns that at best were
met with the neutral tepid language of “legitimate concerns”. That was
what Angela Merkel attempted and for that Hillary Clinton patronises her
as if she were a political freshman. Clinton’s logic is that “it is not
working”, as opposed to “it is not right”.
political expediency is all that matters and immigration is not the hill
to die on. At worst it is a full-throated agreement with populists. The
tenor of Clinton’s comments, the harshness and impatience with tactics
that are not working, is a familiar sickener. Compassion is weakness,
defeat means only that the methods did not work, rather than that the
values were broken. There is no self-reflection.
In her own America, Clinton does not see the disconnect between the
populist posturing on immigration and the facts. Trump made clamping
down on illegal border crossings with Mexico a winning electoral and
polling strategy, despite the fact that such crossings hover at a
40-year historic low. In 2017, there were fewer deportations than in the
previous year under Barack Obama. In 2016, only three of the 16 states
with immigrant populations above 10% voted for Trump. In Europe, numbers
are already down from their 2015-16 highs because of harsher measures,
including a 2016 EU deal with Turkey, new border fences in the Balkans,
and a 2017 bilateral arrangement between Italy and Libya. But Clinton,
having learned a thing or two from populists who always claim the
floodgates are open, is still calling for the barriers to be raised.
I get it. Defeat is hard. Immigration is low hanging fruit, an easy win.
Even those on the left can contort themselves into an anti-immigration
position in defence of white working-class populations. But as a
response to the right it is a proven failed strategy, a race to the
bottom where populists will only benefit from the endorsement. “Why we
lost and how to fight back” was the title of the interview with Clinton
and other centrist politicians – and she unintentionally revealed the
real reason. This is why she lost, and this is why she will not be able
to fight back. I sincerely hope the rumours she will run again in 2020
are true and that Clinton does not go away until this stale,
weather-vane politics is exposed, and buried, for good.
• Nesrine Malik is a Guardian columnist
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